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(FED) Beige Book – September 6, 2017

This report was prepared at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago based on information collected on or before August 28, 2017. The information included in the District reports was primarily collected before Hurricane Harvey made landfall on the Gulf Coast. However, some Districts received preliminary information from business contacts regarding the impact of the storm, which is compiled in a special paragraph in the national summary.

(FED) Chair Janet L. Yellen – Financial Stability a Decade after the Onset of the Crisis

A decade has passed since the beginnings of a global financial crisis that resulted in the most severe financial panic and largest contraction in economic activity in the United States since the Great Depression. Already, for some, memories of this experience may be fading--memories of just how costly the financial crisis was and of why certain steps were taken in response. Today I will look back at the crisis and discuss the reforms policymakers in the United States and around the world have made to improve financial regulation to limit both the probability and the adverse consequences of future financial crises.

(FED) Minutes of the Federal Open Market Committee July 25-26, 2017

The information reviewed for the July 25-26 meeting showed that labor market conditions continued to strengthen in June and that real gross domestic product (GDP) likely expanded at a faster pace in the second quarter than in the first quarter. The 12-month change in overall consumer prices, as measured by the price index for personal consumption expenditures (PCE), slowed again in May; both total consumer price inflation and core inflation, which excludes consumer food and energy prices, were running below 2 percent. Data from the consumer and producer price indexes for June suggested that both total and core PCE price inflation (on a 12-month change basis) remained at a pace similar to that seen in the previous month. Survey-based measures of longer-run inflation expectations were little changed on balance.

(FED) FOMC Statement Jul 26, 2017

Information received since the Federal Open Market Committee met in June indicates that the labor market has continued to strengthen and that economic activity has been rising moderately so far this year. Job gains have been solid, on average, since the beginning of the year, and the unemployment rate has declined. Household spending and business fixed investment have continued to expand. On a 12-month basis, overall inflation and the measure excluding food and energy prices have declined and are running below 2 percent. Market-based measures of inflation compensation remain low; survey-based measures of longer-term inflation expectations are little changed, on balance.

(FED) Chair Janet L. Yellen – Semiannual Monetary Policy Report to the Congress

Since my appearance before this committee in February, the labor market has continued to strengthen. Job gains have averaged 180,000 per month so far this year, down only slightly from the average in 2016 and still well above the pace we estimate would be sufficient, on average, to provide jobs for new entrants to the labor force. Indeed, the unemployment rate has fallen about 1/4 percentage point since the start of the year, and, at 4.4 percent in June, is 5­1/2 percentage points below its peak in 2010 and modestly below the median of Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) participants' assessments of its longer-run normal level.

(FED) Minutes of the Federal Open Market Committee June 13-14, 2017

The Chair observed that, starting with the March 2017 FOMC meeting, Committee participants had been discussing approaches to reducing the Federal Reserve's securities holdings in a gradual and predictable manner. She noted that participants appeared to have reached a consensus on an approach that involved specifying caps on the monthly amount of principal payments from securities holdings that would not be reinvested; these caps would rise over the period of a year, after which they would remain constant. Given this consensus, the Chair proposed that participants approve the plan and that it be published as an addendum to the Committee's Policy Normalization Principles and Plans; the addendum would be released at the conclusion of this meeting so as to inform the public well in advance of implementing the reinvestment policy. It was anticipated that when the Committee determined that economic conditions warranted implementation of the program, that step would be communicated through the Committee's postmeeting statement. Participants unanimously supported the proposal.

(FED) FOMC Statement Release Date: June 14, 2017

Information received since the Federal Open Market Committee met in May indicates that the labor market has continued to strengthen and that economic activity has been rising moderately so far this year. Job gains have moderated but have been solid, on average, since the beginning of the year, and the unemployment rate has declined. Household spending has picked up in recent months, and business fixed investment has continued to expand. On a 12-month basis, inflation has declined recently and, like the measure excluding food and energy prices, is running somewhat below 2 percent. Market-based measures of inflation compensation remain low; survey-based measures of longer-term inflation expectations are little changed, on balance.

(FED) Minutes of the Federal Open Market Committee May 2-3, 2017

The manager of the System Open Market Account (SOMA) reported on developments in domestic and foreign financial markets over the period since the March FOMC meeting. Yields on U.S. Treasury securities declined, and the broad index of the foreign exchange value of the dollar fell modestly. These changes reportedly reflected revisions to investors' expectations for fiscal and other economic policies; some increase in geopolitical tensions; economic and inflation indicators that, on balance, were weaker than anticipated; and monetary policy communications.

(FED) FOMC Statement Release Date: May 03, 2017

Information received since the Federal Open Market Committee met in March indicates that the labor market has continued to strengthen even as growth in economic activity slowed. Job gains were solid, on average, in recent months, and the unemployment rate declined. Household spending rose only modestly, but the fundamentals underpinning the continued growth of consumption remained solid. Business fixed investment firmed. Inflation measured on a 12-month basis recently has been running close to the Committee's 2 percent longer-run objective. Excluding energy and food, consumer prices declined in March and inflation continued to run somewhat below 2 percent. Market-based measures of inflation compensation remain low; survey-based measures of longer-term inflation expectations are little changed, on balance.

(FED) Minutes of the Federal Open Market Committee March 14-15, 2017

The manager of the System Open Market Account (SOMA) reported on developments in U.S. and global financial markets during the period since the Committee met on January 31 and February 1, 2017. Global equity prices generally increased further, credit spreads on corporate debt and emerging market bonds narrowed, and yields on Treasury securities rose somewhat. In survey responses, market participants again reported elevated uncertainty about the outlook for U.S. economic policies and about financial asset prices, but various measures of implied volatility nonetheless declined further.

(FED) FOMC Statement Release Date: March 15, 2017

Information received since the Federal Open Market Committee met in February indicates that the labor market has continued to strengthen and that economic activity has continued to expand at a moderate pace. Job gains remained solid and the unemployment rate was little changed in recent months. Household spending has continued to rise moderately while business fixed investment appears to have firmed somewhat. Inflation has increased in recent quarters, moving close to the Committee's 2 percent longer-run objective; excluding energy and food prices, inflation was little changed and continued to run somewhat below 2 percent. Market-based measures of inflation compensation remain low; survey-based measures of longer-term inflation expectations are little changed, on balance

(FED) FOMC Statement Release Date: February 1, 2017

Information received since the Federal Open Market Committee met in December indicates that the labor market has continued to strengthen and that economic activity has continued to expand at a moderate pace. Job gains remained solid and the unemployment rate stayed near its recent low. Household spending has continued to rise moderately while business fixed investment has remained soft. Measures of consumer and business sentiment have improved of late. Inflation increased in recent quarters but is still below the Committee's 2 percent longer-run objective. Market-based measures of inflation compensation remain low; most survey-based measures of longer-term inflation expectations are little changed, on balance.