Sun, May 31, 2020 @ 04:33 GMT
Trade optimism was the main theme driving the financial markets last week. Investors seemed to be convinced that US and China are close to signing trade agreement phase one, even though it's unsure when and where yet after the...
Dollar was sold off sharply on Friday but, after all, it ended the week only as the third weakest. Sterling was the worst performing one after triple data disappointment, most notably CPI. The once done-deal BoE August rate hike...
Fed's dovish turn occupied a lot of head lines last week. Stocks were lifted while Dollar was pressured. However, the moves were not as drastic as they could seem to be. There was no upside acceleration in stocks. Treasury...
What is a bigger driver of volatility in the markets, politics or monetary policy? Judging only from last week's development, politics got the nod, at least in the US. Investor sentiments initially sank on report that Trump was ready...
Sterling and Brexit was the center of focus during the early part of last week. The parliament vote on Brexit was postponed to at least January. UK Prime Minister Theresa May survived leadership challenge but her position is shaky...
Dollar ended last week as the strongest one as markets put China's coronavius behind. Instead, strong risk sentiments lifted major US indices to new record highs. Friday's pull back was likely due to pre-weekend profit taking only. Latest batch...
Steep selloff in the global stock markets ended up as the biggest news last week. Some attributed the surge in global yields and stock market declines to the solid non-farm payroll report from US. The headline 200k growth confirmed underlying healthiness in the US job market. And more importantly 0.3% mom rise in average hourly earnings in January, following 0.4% mom rise in December, indicates pickup in momentum in wage growth. The case for Fed to hike three times this year looks more likely than ever. And subject to development, Fed could indeed hike the fourth time in December.
With US-China on track to phase one trade deal, and UK preparing for December election, focus turned back to economic data and central banks last week. In particular, Canadian Dollar ended as the worst performing after BoC's surprise dovish...
Dollar ended the week broadly and deeply lower as recent selloff intensified. It should be noted again that the current fall is the continuation of the down trend that started back in January 2017, that is, since US President Donald Trump took office. And that happened despite Fed's three rate hikes last year. DOW gained more than 30% in the period. 10 year yield struggled in most of 2017 but finally surged through a key resistance level at 2.621. Data released during the period showed solid underlying momentum in the economy, except sluggish inflation. Even though Q4 GDP missed expectation, 2.6% annualized growth is still respectable. Fed is more on track for three hikes this year, starting March.
Much volatility was seen in the markets last week with a lot of themes developed. Canadian Dollar ended as the strongest one as strong data boosted chance of August BoC hike. Swiss Franc followed as the second strongest on...
The financial markets took a roller-coaster ride as 2020 started with a bang. US stocks jumped to new record higher to celebrate new year. But sentiments took a great turn after abrupt escalation in Middle-East tensions. Safe-haven flows into...
Dollar survived the geopolitical risks in Korea peninsula, damage of hurricane Harvey, and a set of disappointing non-farm payroll data, to end the week "mixed". While the pull back in EUR/USD caught much attention, we'd like the point out that Dollar ended the week lower against Canadian Dollar, Australian Dollar and Sterling. Indeed, the pound ended as the third strongest major currency, next to Canadian Dollar, even though the third round of Brexit negotiations ended with no concrete progress but more verbal exchanges between EU and UK officials. On the other hand, as risk aversion came and went quickly, Yen and Swiss Franc ended as the weakest ones, just next to Kiwi. Traders could take a brief rest on Monday as US and Canada will be on holiday. But three central bank meetings, RBA, BoC and ECB promise much volatility ahead.
US stocks soared to new record high last week on resurgence of talk of president Donald Trump's expansive policies. In particular, bulls regained control after Trump said he would announce "phenomenal" tax reforms within two or three weeks. DJIA closed the week up 197.9 pts, or 0.99% at 20269.37. S&P 500 gained 18.7 pts or 0.81% for the week to close at 2316.10. NASDAQ rose 67.4 pts or 1.19% to close at 5734.13. All three major indices closed at record highs. The developments helped lift treasury yield from intra-week selloff. 10 year yield closed at 2.409 after dipping to 2.325, comparing to prior week's close at 2.491. Dollar was given a boost and ended as the second strongest major currency, next to Sterling. The Dollar index closed at 100.71, up from prior week's close at 99.73. Fed chair Janet Yellen's testimony to Congress will be a major focus this week. But Trump's tweets and any economy-related announcements will be the things that move markets.
Sterling ended last week as the strongest one as no-deal Brexit is now politically ruled out. But it should be noted that the path forward remains unclear, as least for a few more days. Thus, the upside breakout of...
While US equities surged to new record high last week, other markets didn't follow. Dollar ended mixed in spite of a chorus of hawkish comments from Fed officials, including chair Janet Yellen. A batch of stronger than expected data also provided little support to the greenback. Instead, Dollar was dragged down by treasury yields, which failed to break out from recent range and reversed during the week. Political uncertainties could be a major factor in triggering safe haven flows to US bonds. And such sentiment could also be seen in the broad based weakness in Euro, which closed as the second weakest major currency next to Sterling. Swiss Franc decouple from Euro and Sterling and ended as the second strongest currency. And overall risk aversion on European situation could be the factor in driving up the Japanese Yen, which ended as the strongest major currency.
Dollar's fortune reversed again last week as expectations of Fed July rate cut re-intensified. Such expectations also pushed US equities to new record highs. However, global equities lagged behind, with major FTSE, CAC and Nikkei closed inside prior week's...
Sterling was the weakest one last week as it suffered persistent selloff ahead of UK Prime Minister Theresa May's announcement on resignation. The Pound has indeed stabilized since then after the speculation was realized. Without May, the Brexit path...
Dollar ended the week as the strongest major currency on optimism that Republicans are on track to get the tax bill passed by the end of the year. However, there was certain indecisiveness in Dollar's rally. In particular, the greenback lost momentum as wage growth in non-farm payroll report disappointed. That added to concerns of lack on inflationary pressure, and thus could slow down Fed's tightening pace. But there are two sides of every coin as the greenback just lost momentum, but not reversed. Dollar will look into this week's FOMC rate hike and economic projections for guidance.
After some roller-coaster rides during the week, Dollar staged a broad based come back before the weekly close. The Republicans' tax plan is now back on track for being signed off by US President Donald Trump, by the end of the year, probably even before Christmas. There were various factors sank the greenback. Tamer than expected core CPI reading was one. An additional dissenter in Fed's rate hike was another. But looking back, the uncertainty on whether Senate could get the bill passed was probably the biggest weight on Dollar. It's still early to tell but focus will now be on whether Dollar could stage a sustainable turnaround before year end.
Dollar ended last week as the weakest currency as markets took Fed Chair Janet Yellen's testimony as a dovish one. Traders further pared back bet on a rate hike in September. And the development was accompanied by surge in stock indices to record highs. Canadian Dollar ended as the second strongest as lifted by BoC rate hike and rebound in oil prices. But it was outshone by Australian dollar which soared on iron ore prices. Sterling followed as markets continued to adjust their expectations on a near term BoE hike after central banker comments. Euro and Swiss Franc followed Dollar as the weakest ones ahead of ECB meeting this week. Meanwhile, Yen traded mixed as focus is turning to BoJ meeting.
- advertisement -