Fri, May 24, 2019 @ 15:14 GMT
There were some major surprises in the markets, much volatility and some interesting developments, last week. Dollar ended the week as the weakest major currency as markets were clearly disappointed by the outcome of the dovish FOMC rate hike. Technical developments in Dollar index and treasury yields suggest there more down would be seen in the greenback in near term. There were some good reasons for Euro to surge last week. Those factors include speculations of ECB rate hike by the end of the year, as well as the Euro-friendly results of Dutch elections. But the common currency did end up as the second weakest one. In particular, the sharp pull back of EUR/CHF from as high as 1.0823 to close at 1.0718 indicates that traders are still concerned with political uncertainties ahead. On the other hand, Australian dollar ended as the strongest major currency last in spite of weak employment data. Sterling followed as the second strongest major currency after hawkish BoE minutes. Also, FTSE 100 closed at new record high despite all the Brexit and Scexit news.
While trade tension between the US and its allies dominated the headlines last week, Euro emerged as the strongest major currency. Receding Eurozone internal political risks was a key factor. German 10 year bund yield hit as high as...
Sterling, Canadian Dollar and Euro surged broadly last week on hawkish comments from central bankers. The turn in BoE Governor Mark Carney was the most drastic as just a week a go, he said it's not the time of rate hike yet. But then, he indciated the BoE MPC will start debating raising interest rate in the coming months. BoC Governor Stephen Poloz repeated his comments that prior rate cuts in 2015 have already done their job. But this time, Poloz hinted that BoC is approaching a new interest rate decision. That tremendously raised the odds of a July hike by BoC. There were some jitters on Euro on report that markets misinterpreted ECB President Mario Draghi's comments. But after all, it's generally convinced that, with improvements in Eurozone inflation and growth, ECB is transiting into a phase of stimulus withdrawal. And there would likely be tapering announcement in September or by latest October.
Dollar rose broadly last week as markets received Fed's hawkish rate hike rather week, despite initial hesitation. However, the greenback was just the second strongest, overshadowed by Canadian Dollar. Stronger than expected GDP data from Canada solidify the case...
Global stock market crashed last week as the US finally joined the others. It should be reminded that as DOW made record high in early October, all other major markets suffered selloff already. It's stretched to blame rising US...
Geopolitical tensions somewhat took a back seat last week. The headlines were filled by news of UK snap election, French election, and to a lesser extent US tax reform. Sterling ended the week as the strongest major currency after boosted by the news of snap election and prospect of a "softer" Brexit. Euro survived the terrorist attack in Paris and French election uncertainties to end as the second strongest one. Dollar ended the week mixed as markets seemed not too convinced by news of Trump administration's tax reform. Meanwhile, Canadian Dollar ended as the weakest one as dragged down by WTI crude oil's sharp fall and break of 50 handle. The result of French election on Sunday will be the first market mover this week.
The Swiss Franc and Japanese Yen ended last week as the strongest major currencies. Sentiments were hurt deeply by worries on global trade war. Over week, DOW lost -2.03%, S&P 500 lost -0.89%, DAX was down -3.31%, CAC dropped...
Euro was sold off broadly last week as the markets got a wake up call regarding expectation on ECB policy path. The common currency topped the top mover chart with EUR/GBP losing -1.96% and EUR/CAD lost -1.81%. Weakness in Euro also dragged down the Swiss Franc as GBP/CHF rose 1.77% while CAD/CHF rose 1.58%. On the other hand, Sterling ended as the strongest major currency last week, after some volatility on UK's trigger of Brexit finally. Yen followed as the second strongest major currency as the recovery in US stocks and yields were disappointing. Meanwhile, Canadian dollar ended as the third major currency as WTI crude oil rebounded and closed above 50 psychological level.
It was one of those wild week in the financial markets with a number of market moving themes. New Zealand Dollar was the worst performing one after RBNZ made itself clear that interest rate is going to stay low...
Yen ended last week as the weakest one as the global markets were in full risk on mode. DOW finally made a new record high, together with S&P 500 and the strength is not limited to the US. Nikkei...
Much volatility was seen in the markets last week with a lot of themes developed. Canadian Dollar ended as the strongest one as strong data boosted chance of August BoC hike. Swiss Franc followed as the second strongest on...
Dollar ended the week broadly lower, except versus Sterling, after US president-elect Donald Trump disappointed the markets by not giving any details on his policies during the first post election press conference. Dollar index reached as low as 100.72 before recovering to close at 101.18. Meanwhile, the greenback also took out key near term support level against Euro, Yen and Canadian Dollar, which carries some bearish implications. However, treasury yields staged a strong rebound on Friday, which could provide some relieves to Dollar bullish. 10 year yield closed at 2.380, after dipping to as low as 2.309, comparing to prior week's close at 2.418. Stocks were also resilient with NASDAQ closing a fresh record of 5574.12. DJIA stayed in tight range of around 200 pts. below 20000 handle. There are still prospects for the greenback to strike back is Trump delivers in his inauguration on January 20.
There were some interesting turns in the financial markets last week. Global equities initially cheered after Democrats sealed a tremendous win in the US mid-term election by regaining majority in the House. But the lift quickly faded as stocks...
The global markets reacted rather differently as the US-China trade war formally started while there were only signs of further escalations. Over the week, NASDAQ was a star performer and rose 2.37% to 7510.30. S&P 500 rose in tandem...
The financial markets were generally dominated by positive sentiments last week. Major global economic risks seemed to be receding generally, even though some uncertainties remain. The development was best seen in the strong rally in treasury yields. US 10-year...
It was another volatile week with multiple theme working on the markets. US-China trade truce, arrest of Chinese business executive, stock market routs, treasury yield free fall, US yield curve inversion, weak economic data and global slow down, OPEC+...
We initiate coverage on speculators' activities on major FX futures. According to CFTC's Commitments of Traders, speculators were bearish (NET SHORT) on CHF, JPY, AUD and CAD in the week ended May 8. Meanwhile, they remained bullish (NET LENGTH)...
It's another week with multiple theme happening at the same time. Swiss Franc ended as the strongest on risk aversion. Oil's free fall could be that extra lift the the Franc. Dollar ended as the second strongest, but that's...
US stocks soared to new record high last week on resurgence of talk of president Donald Trump's expansive policies. In particular, bulls regained control after Trump said he would announce "phenomenal" tax reforms within two or three weeks. DJIA closed the week up 197.9 pts, or 0.99% at 20269.37. S&P 500 gained 18.7 pts or 0.81% for the week to close at 2316.10. NASDAQ rose 67.4 pts or 1.19% to close at 5734.13. All three major indices closed at record highs. The developments helped lift treasury yield from intra-week selloff. 10 year yield closed at 2.409 after dipping to 2.325, comparing to prior week's close at 2.491. Dollar was given a boost and ended as the second strongest major currency, next to Sterling. The Dollar index closed at 100.71, up from prior week's close at 99.73. Fed chair Janet Yellen's testimony to Congress will be a major focus this week. But Trump's tweets and any economy-related announcements will be the things that move markets.
Risk appetite in the global financial markets was pretty strong last week. DOW, S&P 500 and NASDAQ shrugged off the much weaker than expected non-farm payroll report from US and all closed at record highs. Strength was also seen in other markets with FTSE 100 in UK and DAX in Germany hitting records too. In Japan, Nikkei also closed above 20000 handle for the first time since 2015. The sharp fall in US yields following NFP argues that markets could be starting to bet on a relatively slower tightening path by Fed and that could be a reason for the strength in US stocks. Eurozone sentiments, on the other hand, was lifted by optimism on easing political risks and improving economic outlook. Meanwhile, UK stocks are riding on the weakening Pound, in particular against Euro.
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