Sat, May 30, 2020 @ 01:44 GMT
Global stock markets suffered steep selloff last week as US President Donald Trump has finally declare the start of trade war with China. Dollar was under broad based pressure with the development, but it was only the second weakest...
Weakness in Sterling and Euro was the main directions in the forex markets last week. Dollar tried to extend recent rally but ended mixed only. Upside of the greenback was limited by persistent trade uncertainties. While commodity currencies ended...
The world got one big step closer to Wuhan coronavirus pandemic with explosion of number of cases outside China in the past last week. South Korea (3150 cases, 16 deaths), Italy (888 cases, 21 deaths) and Iran (388 cases,...
Dollar ended the week broadly and deeply lower as recent selloff intensified. It should be noted again that the current fall is the continuation of the down trend that started back in January 2017, that is, since US President Donald Trump took office. And that happened despite Fed's three rate hikes last year. DOW gained more than 30% in the period. 10 year yield struggled in most of 2017 but finally surged through a key resistance level at 2.621. Data released during the period showed solid underlying momentum in the economy, except sluggish inflation. Even though Q4 GDP missed expectation, 2.6% annualized growth is still respectable. Fed is more on track for three hikes this year, starting March.
Free fall in major government yields extended, and accelerated last week. Meanwhile, it seemed that stocks investors finally woke up with sharply deteriorating sentiments. Major indices staged steep decline as risk aversion heightened. The first factor being the "ever-present"...
Economic data releases have probably never been that meaningless in history. Traders were not too concerned that the Q1, March or even April data were worse than terrible. Instead, hope of lockdown exit, at least partially, have lifted risk...
The unimaginable negative oil price was the biggest head-liner last week. But the impact on other markets were relatively short lived. Canadian Dollar was much bothered for most of the week, but eventually it's just the second worst performing,...
Dollar ended the week as a big loser after the highly anticipated Jackson Hole Symposium. It was pointed out before that there were little expectations for comments on monetary policies from Fed Chair Janet Yellen and ECB President Mario Draghi. And the reactions indeed showed that traders were relieved by the lack on cover on monetary policies. And business returned to usual with EUR/USD resuming recent up trend while Dollar was back under pressure. While Dollar still managed to end higher against Yen, near term outlook remained bearish in USD/JPY and it's just a matter of time to see downside breakout in the pair. Focus will now turn to key economic data including non-farm payroll from US but it's unlikely to safe the Dollar. Another focus to watch this week is another round of Brexit negotiation.
Dollar's broad based weakness continued last week and ended as the worst performing major currency. Stronger than expected consumer inflation reading listed treasury yield and raised the chance of a March Fed hike. Fed fund futures are now pricing in 83% chance of a March hike. But that provided just very brief support to the greenback. Dollar index extended the long term down trend to new three year low, suffering the worst weekly decline since September. Some pointed to Friday's rebound as a sign of reverse in fortune in Dollar. But we'll, for now, take a more cautious stance on it first. Elsewhere, Canadian Dollar and Australian Dollar ended as the second and third weakest ones. Yen, Kiwi and Pound were the strongest.
Dollar ended as the strongest major currency last week as economic data released affirmed a December Fed hike. The surprised contraction in non-farm payroll was offset by strong wage growth. However, the greenback pared back some of its gain on resurgence on North Korea risk. On the other hand, the British Pound suffered broad based heavy selling as there were increasing calls for Prime Minister Theresa May to step down, in the crucial time of trade negotiations with the world. In spite of political uncertainties in Catalonia, Euro showed much resilience and ended the week mixed only. North Korea, Catalonia, Theresa May, Japan election, are the key things to watch ahead. Politics might overshadow economic data again.
Swiss Franc ended last week as the strongest one, very much thanks to the selloff in EUR/CHF. Uncertainty over the EU policy of the new Italian government sent Euro broadly lower, which ended as the weakest. Despite surge in...
Global stock markets somewhat strengthened last week as most countries continued with their coronavirus lockdown exit plan. Yet, with the exception of NASDAQ, major indices were capped below prior week's high. Tensions between US and China remained a major...
There wasn't a unified theme in the forex markets last week. Movements in the major currencies were driven by different factors. But a trend to note is that markets attentions were generally back to central banks, from politics. The divisions in Fed and BoE boards were very apparent and showed that the overall policy stances of both central banks could be shifting. Euro was mixed as it's awaiting economic data to push ECB officials to recede from being too dovish. Meanwhile, Canadian Dollar failed to extend the BoC inspired rally as rate hike bets cooled after tame inflation readings. The extended rout in oil price also added some weight to the Loonie and Aussie. New Zealand Dollar, on the other hand, ended as the second strongest one, next to Swiss Franc, on a mild RBNZ hawkish turn.
The financial markets were generally dominated by positive sentiments last week. Major global economic risks seemed to be receding generally, even though some uncertainties remain. The development was best seen in the strong rally in treasury yields. US 10-year...
The markets originally looked set for a general trend reversal with the synchronized sharp decline in US stocks, yield and the Dollar leading into 2017. Nonetheless, equities staged a strong come back towards the end of last week and helped stabilized both yields and the greenback. The overall solid non-farm payroll report, with strong wage growth, provided some support to sentiments. But it looked more like the trump rally is back in force. While there are still risks of trend reversals, it's much lowered now with S&P 500 and NASDAQ closing at record high at 2276.98 and 5521.06 on Friday. DJIA also just missed 20000 handle by a hair and reached as high as 19999.63 before closing at 19963.80. The coming would be crucial to the overall developments in the markets as Donald Trump's inauguration day on January 20 approaches.
The markets were rocked by three key events last week, UK Election, US-China trade deal and FOMC rate decision. Sterling ended as the strongest one last week as boosted by the Conservative's landslide victory in UK election, removing a...
There are a couple of developments to note in the forex markets last week. Firstly, Dollar ended as the strongest major currencies as markets firmed up the expectation of a June hike by Fed. However, the greenback tumbled sharply against Euro and Swiss Franc before close after weaker than expected inflation data. The dollar index was rejected from 55 day EMA and closed lower at 99.19. That was also accompanied by steep decline in 10 year yield which closed at 2.335. Overall development suggests that the greenback would turn weaker against Euro again as the post French election pull back ends.
Intensifying recession fear was the main theme in the markets in March, alongside never-ending Brexit and trade tensions. With downside risks to growth starting to materialize, major global central banks started their dovish turns. Most notably, Fed now forecasts...
Canadian Dollar ended last week as the strongest one. Strength in oil price, with WTI hitting four-year high was a factor. Solid Canadian GDP and Business Outlook Survey also support a July BoC hike. Euro followed as the second...
Sterling was the star winner last week as boosted by renewed hope of a Brexit deal between the government and opposition. Poor results for both Conservatives and Labours are piling pressure on both parties to end the Brexit standoff...
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