Wed, Jun 03, 2020 @ 11:33 GMT
While trade tension between the US and its allies dominated the headlines last week, Euro emerged as the strongest major currency. Receding Eurozone internal political risks was a key factor. German 10 year bund yield hit as high as...
Yen ended last week as the weakest one as the global markets were in full risk on mode. DOW finally made a new record high, together with S&P 500 and the strength is not limited to the US. Nikkei...
Risk aversion was the dominate theme last week on reverse Trump trade. DJIA suffered the biggest decline this year and lost -317.9 pts or 1.51% to close at 20596.72. S&P 500 dropped -34.27 pts or 1.44% to close at 2343.98. Treasury yield followed with 10 year yield losing -0.101 to close at 2.400. Dollar index dive through 100 handle to close at 99.62, down from prior week's close at 100.31. In the currency markets, Yen was the biggest winner last week on risk aversion and falling yields. Swiss Franc closely followed as the second strongest major currency. Dollar weakened against European majors and Yen but ended up against Aussie and Canadian Dollar. The two were the weakest major currencies last week. In other markets, Gold extended recent rise from 1194.5 and closed at 1248.5, but kept below resistance at 1264.9. WTI crude oil continued to stay in sideway consolidation between 47/50.
Major global central bankers sang a chorus of dovishness last week. Most importantly, both ECB and Fed signaled the possibility of rate cuts ahead. Comparatively, RBA's indication of more rate cut was not much a surprise. In the background,...
Canadian Dollar surged broadly last week following the rally in oil prices. Weaker than expected employment capped the Loonie's gain, but it ended as the strongest still. Sterling survived BoE super Thursday and ended up against all but Canadian....
Global stock market rout intensified last week with major indices ended in deep red. Over the week, Nikkei was the worst performing one and lost -5.98%. S&P 500 was the worst one in the US and dropped -3.94%. NASDAQ...
Dollar ended last week as the strongest major currency Fed communications solidified the case for three hikes this year. Nonetheless, as pointed out a few times, the greenback was held below key near term resistance levels against others...
It was a roller coaster week with political turmoil in Italy dominated the first half of the week. The formation of the populist Italian government after acceptance by President Sergio Mattarella marked the end of the episode. Trade war...
Canadian and US Dollars ended last week as the strongest ones. It now appears that US and China are on track to complete the easier phase 1 trade deal in November. Optimism lifted stocks as well as oil prices,...
Global markets experienced another wild week, with free falls in risk assets and oil prices. Coronavirus pandemic occupied all headlines, ranging from business news, politics, sports and show business. Massive disruption in economic activity is happening. Major central banks and...
The financial markets were like in parallel universes last week. On the one hand, US stocks were boosted by trade optimism as the three major indices ended at record highs. On the other hand, Hong Kong stocks led Asian...
Central bank comments and rate expectations continued to be the main drivers in the global financial markets last week. However, the developments reminded us that no matter how hawkish central bankers sound, monetary policies have to be supported by data. Canadian Dollar being an example that BoC Governor Stephen Poloz's hawkish comments were supported by strong employment data. And the Loonie ended as the strongest major currency as markets are generally expecting a BoC rate hike on July 12 this week. Dollar ended as the second strongest one after solid ISM indices and non-farm payroll headline number even though markets are not convinced of a September Fed hike. Meanwhile, Euro was the third strongest as markets perceived the ECB monetary policy meeting accounts as a hawkish one.
It was a rather dull week last week as US tax plan was the main market driver. Dollar ended broadly lower as investors were clearly dissatisfied with the Senate's version of the plan, which delay corporate tax cut by a year. But judging from reactions in US stocks, comparing to European markets, sentiments were not that bad. For the moment, DOW's up trend is still intact. Similar picture is seen in Dollar which is holding above key near term support level against all other major currencies. Indeed, US long term yields staged the strongest rally in more than a month on Friday, on worry off additional bond supply next year. And the surge in 10 year yield could provide the greenback with extra support. The economic calendar with come back this week with more important economic data, like CPI fro US and UK. And, with a tight working schedule, US tax plan will stay on top as a key focus in the markets.
Dollar ended as the strongest major currency last week as economic data released affirmed a December Fed hike. The surprised contraction in non-farm payroll was offset by strong wage growth. However, the greenback pared back some of its gain on resurgence on North Korea risk. On the other hand, the British Pound suffered broad based heavy selling as there were increasing calls for Prime Minister Theresa May to step down, in the crucial time of trade negotiations with the world. In spite of political uncertainties in Catalonia, Euro showed much resilience and ended the week mixed only. North Korea, Catalonia, Theresa May, Japan election, are the key things to watch ahead. Politics might overshadow economic data again.
Economic data releases have probably never been that meaningless in history. Traders were not too concerned that the Q1, March or even April data were worse than terrible. Instead, hope of lockdown exit, at least partially, have lifted risk...
Intensifying recession fear was the main theme in the markets in March, alongside never-ending Brexit and trade tensions. With downside risks to growth starting to materialize, major global central banks started their dovish turns. Most notably, Fed now forecasts...
It was one of those wild week in the financial markets with a number of market moving themes. New Zealand Dollar was the worst performing one after RBNZ made itself clear that interest rate is going to stay low...
Euro surged broadly last week as economic data suggested a "boom" in Germany ahead. Also, political situation in Germany has improved. Ending as the strongest currency, Euro also took Sterling and Swiss Franc high. On the other hand, Dollar ended as the weakest one as traders held their bet during thin holiday trading. The US tax plan is entering into a "make or break" week. Despite sharp rally in oil price, Canadian Dollar ended as the second weakest one as data suggested that BoC would remain on hold. Aussie and Yen were both weak too. We perceive the rout in China stock markets as a factor in pressuring both.
Deal, deal, deals. They're the main themes in the markets last week. The cross-party Brexit talks in UK collapsed and a high profile Brexiteer is tipped to lead the Brexit process after current Prime Minister steps down. Tensions between...
China's new coronavirus overshadowed central bank activities last week and prompted global risk aversion. At the timing of writing, death toll jumped to 41 while more than 1300 people have been infected globally. The virus has already spread from...
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