Sun, May 31, 2020 @ 03:32 GMT
Dollar ended last week generally lower, except versus Swiss Franc and Canadian Dollar. The greenback was pressured as poor economic data raised recessions fears while traders added to bet of Fed cut this month. Though, there is no clear...
Free fall in major government yields extended, and accelerated last week. Meanwhile, it seemed that stocks investors finally woke up with sharply deteriorating sentiments. Major indices staged steep decline as risk aversion heightened. The first factor being the "ever-present"...
The financial markets were like in parallel universes last week. On the one hand, US stocks were boosted by trade optimism as the three major indices ended at record highs. On the other hand, Hong Kong stocks led Asian...
Canadian and US Dollars ended last week as the strongest ones. It now appears that US and China are on track to complete the easier phase 1 trade deal in November. Optimism lifted stocks as well as oil prices,...
After some jitters on Iran tensions, Dollar ended up as the strongest one last week. Strong stocks and steady yields provided some support to the greenback. Fed officials also reaffirmed the base stance to stand pat this year. US...
As we expected, USD Index futures turned to NET LENGTH of 18 contracts in the week ended May 15. This was driven by increasing pessimism over other major currencies. According to CFTC's Commitments of Traders report, reduction in speculative...
The theme of trade wars overwhelmed the global financial markets last week and overshadowed any other topics. It started on news that US President Donald Trump is going to impose tariffs of 25% on steel and 10%...
We initiate coverage on speculators' activities on major FX futures. According to CFTC's Commitments of Traders, speculators were bearish (NET SHORT) on CHF, JPY, AUD and CAD in the week ended May 8. Meanwhile, they remained bullish (NET LENGTH)...
Dollar's broad based weakness continued last week and ended as the worst performing major currency. Stronger than expected consumer inflation reading listed treasury yield and raised the chance of a March Fed hike. Fed fund futures are now pricing in 83% chance of a March hike. But that provided just very brief support to the greenback. Dollar index extended the long term down trend to new three year low, suffering the worst weekly decline since September. Some pointed to Friday's rebound as a sign of reverse in fortune in Dollar. But we'll, for now, take a more cautious stance on it first. Elsewhere, Canadian Dollar and Australian Dollar ended as the second and third weakest ones. Yen, Kiwi and Pound were the strongest.
Euro surged broadly last week as economic data suggested a "boom" in Germany ahead. Also, political situation in Germany has improved. Ending as the strongest currency, Euro also took Sterling and Swiss Franc high. On the other hand, Dollar ended as the weakest one as traders held their bet during thin holiday trading. The US tax plan is entering into a "make or break" week. Despite sharp rally in oil price, Canadian Dollar ended as the second weakest one as data suggested that BoC would remain on hold. Aussie and Yen were both weak too. We perceive the rout in China stock markets as a factor in pressuring both.
Dollar surged broadly last week as Republican's tax plan overcame another hurdle. The news also sent DOW and S&P 500 to new records, with upside acceleration. Accompanying that, treasury yields closed sharply higher, reversing prior week's loss. Technical development in Dollar was not totally convincing yet. NZD/USD led the way lower as markets were unhappy with the new labour-led coalition in New Zealand. USD/CAD followed after disappointing economic data. Solid risk appetite also pushed USD/JPY and USD/CHF near term resistance to resume recent rally. But EUR/USD was kept in range only, showing much resilience in spite of political turmoil in Catalonia. GBP/USD was also held in range with support from some positive news regarding Brexit. AUD/USD also stays in recently established range.
Dollar ended last week as the strongest major currency Fed communications solidified the case for three hikes this year. Nonetheless, as pointed out a few times, the greenback was held below key near term resistance levels against others...
Dollar took a back seat last week as traders were cautious ahead of the Senate's vote on the tax bill. Sterling took lead instead as boosted by positive Brexit news, as UK and EU seemed to have agreed on the divorce bill and Irish border. Canadian Dollar followed as the second strongest as stellar employment data raised the chance of more BoC hike next year. Meanwhile, Yen ended as the weakest one. It's followed by Euro, despite solid Eurozone data. Now, with the tax bill finally passed in Senate on Saturday, the greenback would likely come back to spotlight this week, with non-farm payroll also featured.
It was a week full of high profile events and much volatility was seen. But in the end, most forex pairs and crosses ended inside prior week's range. Canadian Dollar closed as the second strongest, next to Kiwi, thanks to strong October job numbers. In addition, the Loonie was lifted further as WTI crude oil surged through 55.24 key resistance to resume the up trend that started back in February 2016. Sterling was the weakest one as markets responded negatively to the dovish BoE rate cut. But the pound is stubbornly holding on to key near term support against Dollar, Euro and Yen so far. Dollar ended the week mixed after all the events. FOMC delivered a forgettable statement, Jerome Powell was confirmed as President Donald Trump's nomination as next Fed chair, House released the tax bill. Nonetheless, resilience of the greenback after non-farm payroll miss could be seen as hint of underlying strength. And Dollar could be back into driving seat soon.
Central banks were back in the driving seats in the forex markets last week. Four central banks, Fed, BoE, SNB and BoJ, delivered their monetary policy decisions. But they were all overshadowed by comments from BoC that indicated the next move would be a hike. Canadian dollar ignored the extended selloff in oil price and ended the week as the strongest major currency. Aussie and Kiwi closely followed and took the second and third places. Sterling was boosted by the surprise that three policy makers voted for a rate hike in BoE MPC meeting and closed the week up against Dollar, Euro and Yen. Dollar followed as Fed, after raising interest rate by 25bps, maintained the forecast of a total of three hikes this year. Meanwhile, Yen and Swiss Franc ended as the weakest major currencies as markets were starting to price in an era of monetary policy stimulus exit.
The biggest development last week was the sharp selloff in the British Pound on surging uncertainty over the election in June. FTSE 100 jumped to record high, riding on Sterling weakness. It was believed that the Conservative Party would have a landslide victory back in April when Prime Minster Theresa May called for a snap election. Back then, the Conservative had over 20 points lead over Labour. However, according to the latest YouGov poll showed that the margin narrowed sharply to just 5pts. The news sent GBP/USD to as low as 1.2774 before closing at 1.2794, comparing to 1.3047 high in May. EUR/GBP jumped to as high as 0.8750 before closing at 0.8725, comparing to this month's low at 0.8383. GBP/JPY also dropped sharply to as low as 142.11 before closing at 142.44, comparing to this month's high at 148.09.
Japanese Yen ended as the strongest major currency last week as selloff in global stock markets intensified. Dollar followed closely as the second strongest. Sterling, however, ended as the weakest one despite hawkish BoE announcement which hinted at earlier and faster rate hikes. Euro followed as the second weakest while Aussie was the third weakest. DOW recorded two of the largest single day point drops over the week. And two days of more than 1000 pts decline was definitely historic. Judging from the technical pictures of DOW, FTSE and DAX, while the corrections are not finished, they would enter into "buy zone" of traditional medium term corrections on next fall. That is, we could see the selling recedes soon. However, we'd like to point out a big risk ahead, China stocks, that could make these global selloffs long term corrections.
Yen surged broadly last week and ended as the strongest one as partly driven by flattening yield curve, and partly by global risk aversion. Selloff in oil was one of the major factors driving equities down. Euro and Swiss Franc followed Yen with the common currency supported solidly by strong German GDP. On the other hand, commodity currencies ended as the weakest ones. In particular, data from Australia suggested that RBA would stay on hold for longer than originally expected. Meanwhile, inflation data from Canada argued that BoC won't rush into another rate hike. News from US were mixed. On the positive side, a big step was made with passage of the tax bill in House. On the negative side, the real challenges lie in Senate where Republicans only have a slim majority. And, efforts to reconcile the bills of both chambers are huge. Also, there are concerns of political instability as Special Counsel Robert Mueller's Russian probe is getting closer to US President Donald Trump. But so far, US financial markets have displayed much more resilience than others.
The set of strong non-farm payroll data from US should have finalized the case for Fed to hike interest rate this week. Dollar was indeed given a boost over last week and ended strongly. Nonetheless, the greenback was firstly overwhelmed by strength in Euro, and secondly retreated on profit taking. Overall, Euro ended the week as the strongest major currency as supported by upbeat comments from ECB president Mario Draghi as well as rate speculations. Dollar followed as the second. At the other end, Sterling was troubled by worries over the fading impact it depreciation last year on the economy, uncertainties over Brexit terms, and uninspired by UK budget. The pound ended as the second weakest major currency next to Kiwi.
Dollar ended the week broadly lower, except versus Canadian Dollar. The Loonie was pressured after the "dovish" BoC rate hike which indicates cautiousness of next move. On the background, there was also a lot of uncertainty surrounding NAFTA renegotiation. Euro and Yen followed closely as the third and fourth weakest, ahead of BoJ and ECB meeting. On the other hand, Sterling ended as the strongest one as markets are increasing optimistic on the Brexit deal. Indeed, businessmen and investors could be starting to prepare for a smooth Brexit transition. Australian Dollar followed as the second strongest as solid job data boosts the chance of a rate hike in the second half of the year.
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