Thu, Jul 09, 2020 @ 21:38 GMT
The Caixin manufacturing PMI for China slipped to 50.8 in November, from 51 in October. The reading also missed expectations of 51. Looking into the details, production and new orders increased at modest rates, while purchasing costs rose sharply. However, confidence towards the business outlook dropped to joint-lowest on record. As the agency noted, the manufacturing sector remained stable for most of November, despite 'some signs of weakness'. It forecast that the economy would remain stable for 4Q17. While growth should improve this year, when compared with 2016, it should decelerate in 2018. By contrast, the official manufacturing PMI rose +0.2 point to 51.8 in November this also beat expectations of a drop to 51.5. Non- manufacturing PMI increased +0.5 point to 54.8 last month. Divergence between official and private PMIs is nothing new. Part of the reason for the divergence is that the official data focus on large enterprises, while Caixin's focus on SMEs. This interpretation appears contradicting this month. Indeed, the official report suggests that SME PMI improved, while that for large companies slipped -0.2 point to 52.9 in November.
Despite the mixed headline readings, China's macroeconomic data in May were in line with our view that the country's economy continues to slow. Growth in industrial production fell to 5% y/y, missing consensus of , and April's, 5.4%. IP growth...
Market sentiment improves further as Trump sent more hints on trade truce extension and “substantial progress” on striking a trade deal with China. Indeed, his indication that a deal on “currency manipulation” has send renminbi (Chinese yuan) to the...
China's trade surplus surprisingly narrowed to a 6-month low of US$28.5B in September, from US$42B a month ago. The market had anticipated a milder drop to US$39.5B. Growth in exports improved to 8.1% y/y from 5.5% in August, while growth imports accelerated significantly to +18.7% from July's +13.3%. Notwithstanding a disappointing headline, the report continued to paint a healthy picture on China's economic outlook. A stronger-than-expected imports growth underpinned domestic economic strength. Exports growth, despite missing consensus, still picked up from the same period last year. More importantly, a narrowing trade surplus could tame the US' complaint of China's currency manipulation. This should help the government maintain a stable and modestly strong renminbi as CCP's 19th national congress approaches.
China's trade surplus narrowed to US$40.8B in December from USD44.6B a month ago. From a year ago, exports contracted -6.1% y/y, deteriorating from a -1.6% drop in November, while imports growth decelerated to +3.1%, from November's expansion of +13%. Both contraction in exports and expansion in imports came in worse than expectations. We are concerned that rising oil prices would continue to weigh on the country's balance of payment given China's huge crude oil imports. Released last week, the country's FX reserve was reported to have dropped -US$41B, to US$3.01 trillion, in December. Similar to the past 5 months, the decline was driven by government's selling of foreign currencies to moderate renminbi depreciation
The latest PMI data added further evidence that China’s economy is in bad shape. Trade war with the US has not only weakened trade, but also domestic demand. The job market has also deteriorated, suggesting further stimulus is needed...
China’s trade surplus widened to US$ 34B in October. Exports grew +15.6% y/y, beating consensus of +11.7% and September’s +14.5%. Import expanded +21.4% during the month, exceeding market expectations of +14.5% and +14.3% in September. Interestingly, the headline trade...
USDCNY continues to recover after the pair slumped to the lowest level since December 2015 last Friday. The rebound, long-awaited as the broad-based USD weakness has caused the pair to decline over the past 4 months, is facilitated by PBOC’s announcement to remove the requirement for banks to hold the equivalent of 20% of clients' FX forward positions as reserve for a year at 0% interest. For more than a decade, China has been implementing reforms in its currency, with the ultimate goal of achieving a floating exchange rate regime and convertibility for renminbi – a movement widely described as renminbi internationalization. However, this report seeks to explain that the government has only been moving back and forth, without making significant progress in transforming renminbi into a market-oriented exchange rate.
China's financial system continues to display fragility and liquidity squeeze. China's 7-day repo rate jumped to 5.5% (close), the highest level since late 2014, on Tuesday, followed by PBOC's injection of RMB 80-90B to the market on Wednesday as some small banks failed to repay debts in the interbank market. Less than a week ago, PBOC raised a range of short-term and medium-term interest rates to reduce financial risks, thought to be a response to Fed funds rate hike. Interbank rates should remain volatile over the coming week, ahead of PBOC's quarterly macro-prudential assessment in late March. Although recent data suggested that the problem of capital outflow eased in February, ongoing interest rate normalization in the US would prolong China's capital outflow problem, sustaining the challenges facing China in the implementation of its monetary policy.
In PBOC's latest set money report, China's new renminbi loans rose to RMB 2.03 trillion in January. However, it came in below consensus of RMB 2.44 trillion and RMB 2.5 trillion the same period last year. Although it is usual for new loans to be high earlier in a year as banks front-load their loans for profit maximization, the January figure missed expectations as lending to non-bank financial institutions fell for the month. Outstanding renminbi loans growth decelerated to +12.6% y/y, from +13.5% in December. Medium and long term corporate bank lending, a barometer of corporate sector demand, increased +43.4% y/y to RMB 1.52 trillion, whilst medium- and long-term household loans, mainly mortgage loans, rose to a record high of RMB 0.63 trillion. This suggests that PBOC's recent tightening measures have yet to feed through the housing market. We believe a few months' data would be needed to see the effectiveness of these measures.
China’s macroeconomic data showed a mixed picture in March. Growth in industrial production (IP) eased to +6% y/y, compared with consensus of +6.9% and January- February’s +7.2%. The inflation report released last week also showed that headline CPI slowed markedly...
China’s economic data surprised to the downside in July. Delay in US tariff should have limited boost on China’s growth outlook. Industrial production gained +4.8% y/y in July, missing consensus of +5.8% and June’s 6.3%. The slowdown is the...
Headline CPI in China accelerated to +4.5% y/y in November, from +3.8% a month ago. The key contributor to strong inflation is fresh vegetable and pork prices. Non-food price climbed +1% y/y from +0.9% in October. Excluding food and...
The official manufacturing PMI for China climbed +0.5 point higher to 51.7 in November, another month of big increase after October's 0.8-point gain. The non-manufacturing PMI (services and construction activities) soared +0.7 point to 54.7. The services PMI added +1.1 points to 53.7, while the construction PMI slipped -1.4 points to 61.4. The Caixin/Markit version of manufacturing PMI, by contrast, fell to 50.9 in November from a 27-month high of 51.2 a month ago. Despite the fall, Markit noted that it remains the second-highest reading in 2 years and indicates that 'the manufacturing industry continued to pick up steam'. Moreover, although index readings for both output and new orders declined, those 'tracking input and output prices rose at a faster pace to hit their highest levels in 5 years, pointing to further intensification of inflationary pressure'.
A number of good news has increased optimism over China. Following announcement of a Phase I trade deal with the US, the latest set of economic data surprised to the upside in November. However, we expect the bullishness will...
For the first time in over 3 years, People’s Bank of China (PBOC) lowers the rate of the 1-year medium lending facility (MLF) by -5 bps to 3.25%. This surprising move underlines the rapid deterioration of domestic growth and...
China's macroeconomic data for 2Q17 surprised to the upside. China's GDP expanded +6.9% y/y in 2Q17, same pace as the prior quarter but above consensus of +6.8%. Economic activities in June continued to improve. Industrial production growth accelerated to +7.6% y/y in June, beating consensus of and May's +6.5%. Retail sales expanded +11% y/y in June, up from +10.7% a month ago. The market had anticipated mild deceleration to +10.6%. Fixed asset investment in urban areas grew +8.6% y/y in the first half of the year, same pace as in the first five months of the year. The government acknowledged that the country's economy continued to improve. It appears that the country's growth is on track to meet the government target of “around +6.5%”.
Headline CPI eased to +1.7% y/y in January, missing consensus of and December’s +1.9%. The slowdown was mainly driven by food price which fell -0.6 percentage point to +1.9%. Non-food inflation steadied at +1.7%. PPI decelerated sharply to +0.1%...
Yesterday, PBOC announced a -50 bps reduction in reserve requirement ratio (RRR) for commercial banks. The move, effective from July 5, aims at easing the tightening in credit condition with the injection of about RMB 700B of liquidity to...
Economic data in April prove that China’s economy is not yet out of the wood. Growth in industrial production , retail sales and fixed asset investment all surprised to downside, suggesting that the rebound in March was only due...
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